Brick and Mortar vs. Flesh and Blood – They Both require Care

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“Americana” 16 x 20 acrylic on canvas

I’m giving our villa “a dust up” in preparation for sale and asking myself “How would a potential buyer see this room, this painting, this piece of furniture or memorabilia?”

When I find something out-of-place or obtrusive, I have three choices:

  1. Put it in a Good Will box to be given away
  2. Place it in a container for “safe keeping”
  3. Dump it without regard for sentiment

Each item saved for Good Will must pass a certain test: Can it be cleaned? Would someone else be able to use this or is it just old junk?

The box for “safe keeping” holds stuff that a loved one has given me or that belonged to one of my parents or grandparents. I can’t throw these things away without feeling guilty. Besides, I might need some of them in our new place. I plan to put these things aside until nearer the actual move giving me a second chance to keep or to throw them away. In number three, some of the “dump” items may fall into this category.

In truth, I’m a sentimental saver. I have difficulty parting with gifts from loved ones even though they serve no logical purpose. And after a while, these items begin to clutter the walls and shelves and look like somebody’s junk to potential buyers seeing our home for the first time.

moody-blues-carol-allen-anfinsen

“Moody Blues” 18 x 14 oil on canvas

These decisions can be painful. You soon discover what’s really of value and what’s simply ostentatious. Impulse buying adds an accumulation of stuff that makes its way to the dump box. You buy an item on sale, or someone else does and then gives it to you. In either case, you know you probably won’t miss any of it when it’s gone.

Wouldn’t it be great to give your body a clean sweep like this? You could keep only what adds real value to your life and cast away the rest. You could get rid of bad habits and regrets, put old grievances in a box and tape the lid shut, and finally focus on what’s important.

Gone are the “To Do” lists that were never finished, the half-made quilts, the dreams that got away. All could stop gathering dust in your closet and finally RIP at the bottom of some landfill for recycling. You could make a fresh start with more realistic goals and some well-defined dreams that come from deep inside of you instead of from peer pressure.

Once the cobwebs have been swept from your interior, you could start unearthing your most urgent needs and longings. Find out who you are and what you’re made of in the scheme of things.

What is your heart’s desire? Discover the spiritual roots of your personality and your divine nature. Discard the negative aspects of yourself that turn other people off. Scrub out the dingy coating that has crept inside and tarnished your luster. Let your hidden treasure shine through and regain your self confidence.

When all is said and done, your mortal body is the house you live in every day until “Death Do you part.” Then your immortal spirit is liberated from all physical encumbrances and restraints. Since you only live once, doesn’t it make sense to spend as much time getting your spiritual house in order as you spend on getting your physical house ready to sell to strangers?

The Cook

“The Cook” 11 x 14 acrylic on canvas

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