Those Awkward Moments – Filling in the Gaps

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A Joyful Heart, 11 x 14 pastel

A Joyful Heart, 11 x 14 pastel

Some things, if repeated often enough, catch on. Take the word “awkward” said in a sing song voice after someone puts their foot in their mouth or there’s a lapse in conversation.

It happens to all of us. When my husband and I were dating, he’d fill in those silent spaces by saying: “Yup, yup, yup.” I tease him about it now; but obviously, when we were getting to know each other, he felt uneasy when there was a “pregnant pause” between our exchanges.

I’m a writer and an artist by trade so I’m better on paper and canvas than in verbal discussions where the bold and the loud hold sway. Maturity and life hurdles have given me muster, but essentially “chit chat” is not one of my strong suits.

Once I bumped into a mirrored pillar in a department store and said “excuse me.” When I looked up and saw that the open-mouthed face staring back was mine, I laughed in surprise. It’s healthy to laugh at yourself. When things go wrong seeing the humor can soften a bad situation.

Like the time my teenaged boyfriend walked me home from school and the elastic around my waist band snapped. I felt my slip crumple to the ground. Hey, at least it wasn’t panties! I stepped out of the slip, rolled it in a ball and carried it under my arm as we walked home. Nothing to fret about. Just another reason to make light of an embarrassing scene.

"Kindred Spirits" 30 x 24 mixed media on canvas

“Kindred Spirits” 30 x 24 mixed media on canvas

Another time I wore my skirt inside out to a meeting. I didn’t notice until half-way through the speaker’s message, and then I turned three shades of red thinking that the frayed seams and ragged hemline announced my stupidity. A quick trip to the girl’s room fixed my dilemma before any fuss could be made of it.

Waiters and waitresses are notorious for being on the receiving end of complaints by getting skimpy tips and insults. A waitress once spilled a glass of soda into my lap and apologized profusely. I could tell by her body language and facial expression that she expected an irate tongue lashing. When I smiled and said, “Everyone makes mistakes,” she breathed a sigh of relief. How could I not forgive her when I’m a klutz myself by nature?

On the news recently, someone pulled out a gun and shot someone for spilling a cocktail on his expensive suit. Many people take offense at far less than this. The world is turning into a population of whiny, short-tempered egoists who want their lives to progress without any problems. Pity the person who gets in their way.

Awkwardness is part of growing up, for Heaven’s sake; a stage of life prone to accidents. Arms and legs grow faster than we know how to use them. One day we’re short people with the perspective of a pup, and before we know it we’re towering over our parents but still under their rule and command. This odd time needs to be handled with patience and good humor.

"Shimmy Shake" 11 x 14 acrylic in black box frame

“Shimmy Shake” 11 x 14 acrylic in red box frame

My first marriage died from lack of humor. When you can’t laugh at yourself, or you resent other people teasing you or playfully trying to ease you out of a bad moment, you’ve got a compatibility problem.

Irritable, touchy people hate it when you try to cheer them up. They’re afraid that if they laugh or give into humor they might lose control and compromise their dictatorship.

Shouting from behind may get people to move, but real leadership beckons from the front with words of encouragement that say: “You can do it! Come on – follow me; I’ll show you how. Let’s do it together.”

Patience and kindness can bridge those awkward times we find ourselves in. No one has a “right” to make other people miserable or to constantly demand his or her own way. Relationships require that both parties get something out of it. Unpleasant personal encounters and dealings with other people should always be courteous and respectful, period!

"And All that Jazz" 11 x 14 acrylic in red box frame

“And All that Jazz” 11 x 14 acrylic in red box frame

Ironies that Fool, Deceive, and Humor

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"Mother and Child" 11 x 14 brush drawing

Ironies that Fool, Deceive, and Humor:

  • People who constantly remind others of their honesty usually aren’t!

Case in point: I had a Real Estate Agent who had the habit of repeating the end of each sentence. She wanted me to trust her advice and opinion and told me how thorough and wonderful she was. She concluded by saying “I’m so honest, I stink, I stink, I stink.” Hey, I believed her! I found a new Realtor.

  • Those who use high-sounding rhetoric to make promises they cannot keep are usually full of baloney!

Take the current winner of 10 Pinocchio’s according to the Washington Post: our current President Obama. He has promised what he has not delivered, and continues to use the same rhetoric to declare his promises were true. Results matter! Words cannot distort the facts! Trust must be earned not given.

  • Most Hollywood elites want gun control yet they are the first to promote gun violence in theater.

Money at the box office and in their pockets seems to make up for the lack of integrity and Constitutional smarts these buffoons display.

  • The very people who espouse a one-size-fits-all doctrine for others are the same ones who tailor their own wants and needs in specifics.

Our legislators, our government has one set of policies and rules for us and another for themselves. They have their own tailor-made health care plan, refusing to sign up for Obama Care.

When they retire from governing, most have accrued sizable bank accounts and a guaranteed retirement income equal to or better than their current salaries courtesy of the American tax payer.

  • A code of ethics works only when people are honest. The dishonest will always find a way or ways to bypass, ignore, or corrupt the system.

  • People spend exorbitant amounts of money on their pets and rescue animals, yet they cannot find room in their hearts for one more baby.

Human infants are at risk. They are currently an “endangered species.” We are fast failing to replace ourselves in numbers. Who will take care of the next generation’s aging population?

And that’s my two cents! What’s yours?