This Generation is Floundering against all Odds



When I was growing up we knew right from wrong, at least in our own household. Our “standards” were expected to be kept even when we were away from home. These values were black and white. You didn’t steal other people’s property. You worked hard to get what you wanted. You didn’t cheat on a test or in a game. You told the truth or you suffered the consequences. Your word was your bond. My sisters and I headed into the future grounded by a strong foundation and internal principles.

By the time my own children were in public school, these absolute truths were changed and disavowed. All of a sudden values were different for different folks. What one person valued may be another person’s nemesis. Truth became personal and more difficult to define. There were flexible rules and a stigma placed upon thousands of years of proven behavior. There was no foundation to rest upon except in the empty churches that were diminishing in number.


Traditions were frowned upon, unless they were just for fun or to draw people together. History was mocked, defamed, and changed. The people of the past were no longer revered and remembered. Their principles were considered out of date and old fashioned. Documents and books that had served us well in the past were now ignored and efforts were made to alter them or abolish them altogether.

People who in former days would have turned to God for strength began to turn to substance abuse and addiction to get them through. The unprincipled and the unbelievers hearkened to the loudest and most popular voices for information and guidance. What happened was a total upheaval of the infrastructure that had kept society in check.


The educational system celebrated their new-found freedom to bend and manipulate young minds. What they reaped we now experience as we watch America’s value system and Constitutional principles crumble around us. The future is unknown and terrifying. Those who believe in the Bible, the Word of God, see it as fulfillment of Prophecy. Every chapter, every verse leads up to these perilous and predicted times.

The hand writing is on the wall. When you ignore your past moorings, you are doomed to failure. God is the same yesterday, today and tomorrow. His unchanging Word speaks to our hearts in this present day. Without faith we can do nothing.

We are living in a time of confusion and apostasy. By trusting in our own made up priorities and values, we cut off the source of all truth. In our arrogance, we figuratively trust in the arm of weak flesh. We put our faith in dead idols that can neither hear us nor see us. We light candles to unknown Gods and are consumed with our own lusts. We have become a degenerate nation filled with our own self-importance and intellectual prowess.


I for one like the winds of change I see ahead of us. There is still hope in America if we turn our hearts away from vain pride and evil corruption. Let us open our hearts and minds to things eternal. Our choices define us. Our choices will also condemn us if we fall from the Grace that is offered to us freely and lovingly. It is never too late to come home to the Father and God who made us all.


Inspirational People and how they Effect your Life


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American Express publishes an online newsletter. The last issue was titled “Strategies of Highly Inspirational People.” As an artist and writer that grabbed my attention. Creative’s are always looking for inspiration.

The article made me think of all the people in my past who inspired not only my artistic endeavors, but made me want to become a better person. My sister Jean was one of those people.

She struggled with multiple sclerosis (M.S.) for over 30 years, yet she remained positive, bubbly and happy. Even when she could no longer speak or move without help, her bright eyes spoke for her. She chose how she would face her adversity. Every new day, she donned her internal attitude like a cloak that was visible to all who knew her.

When Jean finally passed away, she defied age. Her pristine complexion glowed. There were no wrinkles or frown lines to mar her beauty. Her hair was still thick and glossy. There were no telltale signs of gray.

Some people thought her appearance came from the cortisone shots she received throughout her ordeal. I believe her lifelong loveliness came from within. Her internal compass was focused on eternal things; an inner strength, which gave her an aura of joy and peace. Even before she contracted M.S., Jean’s outgoing personality attracted many friends. She built a successful business. She won golf trophies and art awards. She participated in life fully.

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Here is the American Express list of the 10 “Strategies of Highly Inspirational People.” Note how many of these traits the people you admire share.

Inspirational people:

  1. Make permanent connections “I care and thought about you today.”
  2. Bring people together – introduces to others
  3. Believe people are good
  4. Welcome people who disagree – authentic, comfortable in their beliefs
  5. Act fearlessly, even when afraid
  6. Give back to the community
  7. Show gratitude
  8. Tell a good story and share personal ones that turn into motivational experiences
  9. Are responsive and dependable

People who make you feel good about yourself are the ones you’ll remember. Like skipping stones on water, they cast a ripple effect on others that extends outward. Their influence continues long after their gone.

My grandfather Allen had that kind of impact on my life. He was loving, but firm. His granddaughters, me included, wanted to please him and make him proud of us. He taught us how to dance. He put books on our heads and showed us how to walk straight with our heads held high.

He encouraged us to be unafraid. As a biologist and science teacher, he explained how things worked in nature and demonstrated there was no need to fear. He allowed a green garden snake to wind up his arm and a huge garden spider to creep softly over his skin. He kept a pet tarantula that seemed like a fuzzy friend after he handled it so adroitly.

Because of him, my love for nature grew. I gained respect for conservation and preservation of all living things, including human life. How can you reverence life and at the same time destroy it?


(Great Grand Baby) Dexter learning how to feed himself.

We are the caretakers of the earth; the stewards, if you will. The balance of nature must be respected and ensured if we are to be healthy and happy. What my grandpa taught me changed my life forever and formed my interests and personality.

Every life we touch has an influence on us either for good or evil. Cherish the people and friends who make lasting imprints on your deepest self and those who positively change the course of your life’s direction.

Teachers should Nurture, Enlighten and Protect their Students

"An Open Book" 16 x 20 mixed media on canvas

“An Open Book” 16 x 20 mixed media on canvas

I come from a long line of teachers, and take pride in having five teachers in our family today. I revere teachers and respect their profession. As the mother of six children, I had a lion’s share of parent-teacher conferences and PTA meetings. Over the years, I’ve seen good teachers and bad teachers.

Ms. Morrell was my English teacher; a stern spinster, and the butt of jokes and complaints from her students. But without her, I may never have become a writer. She knew her stuff! She was firm, but patient. She insisted on good behavior and was a hard task master when it came to grammar. And she could see past the jeers and bluster of her students.

She encouraged me to enter the school’s literary contest and I won. She saw in me what I couldn’t see in myself. I remember her to this day, not as the frumpy spinster with the stern look, but for what she taught me: lessons that stayed with me throughout my life.

"Looking Outward" 3-D painting in an actual window frame

“Looking Outward” 3-D painting in an actual window frame

Mr. Holmstead was my History teacher; a fun-loving man who walked a shaky line between likability and control. Somehow he managed; not because of classroom rules or rigid authoritarianism, but through his own charisma and passion for his subject.

Whether you liked history or hated it, you were bound to love how Mr. Holmstead told a story. He captured your attention and made history seem relevant and wondrous. The test questions were easier to remember because of the performance and the theatrics he tied to each fact. Those who thought history was boring were in for a big surprise.

By noon, Mr. Holmstead already had a five o’clock shadow. By the end of the day, his tie had been loosened, his jacket hung on a chair and his sleeves were rolled up. We loved history because he loved history. His teaching was infectious.

And then there are the not-so-great teachers. I met one of them at a parent teacher conference. She was irritated by my energetic son. “He fidgets too much at his desk,” I was told.

“And why does he fidget,” I asked? Turns out my son finished his work before the other students and then he became a distraction. He even turned over his paper and doodled on the back (imagine that!) making his worksheet messy and dirty (the nerve).

By the time I finished listening, I knew there was nothing I could say or do to change this teacher’s mind. I did suggest that she give my son another sheet of paper to doodle on while he waited, but she refused, saying that she didn’t have time to cater to one student. Oh the “mind is a terrible thing to waste!” (Negro College Fund Slogan)

Here is the flip side to that story. In my son’s sixth grade year, he had a teacher named Mrs. Bush. The children loved her, not because she was lenient or friendly, but because they knew what to expect from her. Her discipline was consistent; her style full of expectation and follow through.

My son was still the same wiggly, talkative child, but she used that enthusiasm to their mutual advantage. When he sat fidgeting after finishing his work, she showed him how to use the classroom camera. He took pictures of designated materials under her supervision. And wouldn’t you know, the envious other children began to work harder to finish their work so that they could use the camera.

At one point, during their study of China, Mrs. Bush showed him a tiny picture of a Chinese dragon and challenged him to see what he could do with it. She gave him some brushes and paints and turned him loose on the classroom window. By the end of the day, he had completed a giant, colorful dragon; an exact replica of the original small drawing.

That painting amazed not only me, but the entire school. Mrs. Bush saw a glimmer in my son and harnessed his active mind and body; a true modern-day miracle worker. Teachers like this never scream for recognition or pay, but they deserve it. They simply do what they do best: teach children. I say God bless them!